Tag Archive: get out


 

get-ou

Here are this year’s nominees for Best Picture:

Call Me By Your Name

Darkest Hour

Dunkirk

Get Out

Lady Bird

Phantom Thread

The Post

The Shape of Water

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Who I’m Cheering For: Come on…

Who Should Win: Last year (I think) established unless you have ‘Titantic’, nobody really knows until the envelopes are (double) checked.  ‘Dunkirk’ is the most traditional feeling Best Picture.  ‘Get Out’ is the one we’ll still be referring back to years from now.  Actors love ‘Three Billboards’ and percentage wise we have the most votes.  Take your pick…

Who Will Win: I’ll call ‘The Shape of Water’.  Across all the branches, this one feels the most respected.

Enjoy the show!

 

 

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‘Get Out’

 

get-out-allison-williams-daniel-kaluuya

The number one movie in America this weekend is extremely clever.

As I and others have pitched, start with a Key and Peele premise (‘black guy goes to meet the parents of his white girlfriend’) and instead of one upping on the side of silly comedy, one up the stakes with awkward, creepy comedy.  And you have ‘Get Out’.

Not even a horror guy but I dug this one.  Not scary in terms of gore, scary in terms of suspense and…not really knowing exactly what’s going on until well into the third act.  It’s a hell of a step on his own play by Jordan Peele, who provides just enough silliness to cut the tension and keep the audience relaxed.  This film is a like microaggression Hall of Fame (with Obama and Tiger compliments and more than a few passive aggressive comments on the black man’s physique).  The layers here go deep, I can’t even give you a really good comparison movie wise.  My only real critique (after I had time to think about it) was the reveal of one character’s intentions came five minutes too early.

As far as the ‘racist’ critique, I know where that comes from, but I think it’s too general.  The villains in the film aren’t ‘the white race’; it’s a very specific subset.  And even the choice of that subset is part of the social commentary of the film.

So if you didn’t get to this over the weekend, high recommend here.