Tag Archive: black panther


 

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‘Lessons from the Screenplay’ has quickly become my favorite video essay series in breaking down why some films and TV shows work (and some don’t)…

Today, Michael Tucker breaks down Killmonger and Black Panther, and to say I was enthused by his thesis is an understatement.

Enjoy!

 

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civilwar

Five spoiler free thoughts for those of you who are going to see Captain America: Civil War this weekend:

  1. Up until it happened, if you would have told me they figured out a way in modern times to make Captain America a bad ass, I would have laughed in your face.  But here we are.
  2. The debut of Marvel Batman. Chadwick is great, they made the suit look great. We know how it starts but there’s still a TON of things left unsaid that sets up his own film. (glancing in another studio’s direction…)
  3. As much as every part of me wanted to roll my eyes at the Star Wars reference…I laughed.  it was pitch perfect.
  4. I had my doubts, but I AM ALL IN ON REBOOTING SPIDER MAN RIGHT AWAY WITH AN ACTUAL TEENAGER AND UNCLE MALIK IS ALL IN ON HOT AUNT MAY! Best parts of the movie.
  5. To review: understood Iron Man’s motivation.  Understood Cap’s motivation.  Understood villain’s motivation.  Funny in several spots. Successfully introduced more than one new hero. Knew when to be funny, knew when to be serious. First must see movie of the summer.

Also, my updated in retrospect review of Batfleck v Boy Scout and all future DC attempts to play catch up until further notice:

Have a good weekend everybody!

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So first, a refresher on where I’m coming from: fan of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (who isn’t?), have some knowledge of  the characters in comic book form, but not everything.

So I’ll try to keep my hot takes spoiler free from here on out…

  • James Spader as the voice of Ultron was fantastic casting.  Smarmy, whiny, and funny as hell.  Maybe a little too funny for the main villain, whose goal is the destruction of mankind.
  • Conversely, nice to get Paul Bettany some face time.  He’s one of many references to the individual films of the heroes who makes a cameo of sorts in the Big Sequel. Really sells the idea that all these films take place inside one Universe.
  • But with all these allusions to past and future films, when we actually go to Wakanda we don’t get a cameo or even a more direct reference to…?
  • Speaking of the future, I thought the single thing Avengers 2 did best was lay the groundwork for the upcoming ‘Civil War’ storyline.  If we don’t get worn out on superhero films in the next decade, that will be The One.

Overall, another really fun movie that feels like a comic book come to life (though I still prefer the first one).  DC released the Suicide Squad team picture tonight.

They better get on point…

Black Panther

One of the side effects of this boom period of comic book heroes is that everyone gets a shot to shine.  The Black Panther is a Marvel character brought into existence to cater specifically to the African-American audience.  While the name suggests a superhero based on the Oakland socio-political group, in fact this character is the King of the fictional African country Wakanda.

Reggie Hudlin wrote and produced this animated version of the character for BET last year (and now streaming on Netflix).  He put together an all star voice cast (Alfre Woodard, Kerry Washington, Jill Scott, Djimon Hounson as the Panther) for this version of the character that’s every bit as broad as its origins.  The story told here stays true to the ‘on the nose’ nature of the character and his self-righteous origins (in one of the first episodes, the Black Panther defeats Captain America and tells him to go back to where he came from, he doesn’t belong in Africa.  And I’m only slightly paraphrasing that line.)

From what I recall, a live action version of the Black Panther is in development.  I don’t know if it will work with the tone of the animated series.  As far as Hudlin’s version goes though, it works for what it’s intended to be: a safe alternative for young black kids.