Tag Archive: j edgar


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Bradley Cooper gets his third nomination in a row as the title character in this Oscar nominee.  To address the personal elephant in the room, ‘Can I separate our obviously different ideologies from Clint Eastwood’s craft?’ The answer: I (try to) do it all the time when it comes to art.  Saying this film is superior to ‘Jersey Boys’ and ‘J. Edgar’ in not a debate in my opinion.

Based on the true story of the most ‘successful’ sniper in U.S. military history, Cooper puts on the weight and takes on the Texas accent to play Chris Kyle, the All-American hero who goes from cowboy to assassin.  Sienna Miller is for the second time this awards season barely recognizable as the wife of an American hero whose life is cut short.

is this film a pure propaganda piece?  I’ve heard that argument, but I saw it more as a character piece (Chris eventually feels the psychological effects of war and all the murders he’s committed in the name of country). Eastwood and Cooper are both golden boys for their generations, so if voting blocs get splintered, they have to be serious dark horse candidates for Oscar.

We shall see…

J. Edgar

 

I heard a lot of mild criticism when J. Edgar came out so I didn’t have my hopes real high when I finally got a chance to see it.  It’s not a bad film by any means, but against the best work of either Clint Eastwood or Leonardo DiCaprio, this film definitely falls into both men’s second tier.

The film tells the story of the rise of the F.B.I. and its controversial figurehead, J. Edgar Hoover.  This film isn’t an action flick by any stretch, so the sections about the Bureau (like the Lindbergh case) aren’t dramatically interesting until a third act revelation.  Like most character studies, this film revolves around the relationship the main character has with others.  In this case it’s Hoover’s relationship with his mother (an icy Judi Dench), and his ‘right hand man’ at the Bureau (played by Armie Hammer).  The real Hoover was supposedly a closeted homosexual, and where Eastwood’s film really shines is in exploring both why J. Edgar was repressed in his sexuality and even more telling, how living a secret life possibly opened the door to an obsession with other people’s secrets.  If you want to go all the way with it, does selling the world on one big lie make it easier to sell others (including yourself) on a hundred other smaller lies over the course of a lifetime?  It’s an interesting thought.

You can add me to the chorus of those who think Leo was miscast in this role, but can’t say it was a bad business decision.  Even with Clint’s pedigree, I doubt Warners would have signed off on Philip Seymour Hoffman playing the title character (but that would have been something!)